Sardines

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When I was young, my parents would often buy canned sardines in tomato sauce for breakfast, and being the squeamish fussy ingénue that I was, would carefully remove the guts from each sardine before eating it. Not only was that totally unnecessary, but in fact I was missing out on the nutrients that you can get from eating fish whole, including the bones and organs. Sardines are a great source of Omega 3 fats and a bunch of other vitamins and minerals which you can read about in the related links. As always, check the ingredients label because you don’t want sardines soaked in vegetable oils. I like the sardines in springwater from Aldi (around 70 cents a tin).

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I find sardines a bit boring to eat straight out of the can, but they are delicious in this French preparation (traditionally made with fromage frais, for which I use half yogurt/half sour cream as a substitute). You could make up a big batch and have it for breakfast, quick easy and nutritious.

Rillettes de sardines

Serves 1-2

  • 2 x 125g tins of sardines (in springwater), drained
  • ½ small red onion, finely diced
  • 2-3 tbsp lemon juice (to taste)
  • 2 tbsp yogurt
  • 2 tbsp sour cream
  • 2-3 tbsp finely chopped parsley
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • Optional: chopped dill, chives

Dairy-free Version

Instead of the yogurt and sour cream, use 2 tbsp mashed avocado (or cauliflower puree) and 1.5 tbsp extra virgin olive oil.

Mash up sardines with a fork. Add all other ingredients and mix thoroughly.

Related Links
Eat This:Sardines
How and Why to Eat sardines